Hiding Behind the Questions

In a spirituality group recently I observed what I have seen many times, and have done myself. In an effort to avoid facing the larger story of God’s relationship to man and the teachings of the Bible, countless questions are asked. The questions were not about basic promises, benefits and God’s desire to have us under his wing, but about whether Adam and Eve had an umbilical cord. Discussion among the group members was not about our deep need to be in control instead of turning it over to God, but ranged from which daytime talk show host was best to where Cain got his wife.

Part if the fault is mine; I am sometimes not as good at keeping the topic in a general area of spirituality as I should be. The concept is real, however, in that we get lost in the weeds, and aren’t able to view the lay of the land. I believe is often intentional, though never admitted. We would rather use the unanswered questions as a reason (excuse) for not facing the hard truths of our inadequacy. The basic broken human condition is hard to accept, but is essential to understanding our need for salvation and guidance. We will always have more questions than answers, so we might as well get used to the fact. The basic temptation that started our mess came from the first couple’s desire to know.

I’m not advocating ignorance for the sake of bliss. We should find out what is knowable, but not allow our lack of knowledge to stand in the way of our path to God. Claiming God must provide answers to all questions means our ignorance is his fault. He will teach us new things as we follow and trust him. Can we be okay with not knowing? We say we want to see the way; we convey truth to be important; we claim to want more light. We have all those in one source: the way, the truth and the light. If we begin there, we operate from a platform of knowing all we need to know. We then can make amazing discoveries along the way.

 

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2 comments

  1. The umbilical chord is similar to the “where did Paul go on his missionary journey” type questions that keep everyone fenced inside “safe” territory. Such questions avoid the tough issues that some of us enjoy tackling. We do indeed know all we need to know to secure our own salvastion, but very few know enough to defend the faith. If anyone should grow tired of the academic (basic) questions or of rediculous discussions, might I suggest Christian apologetics. That field is enormously informative. Without some knowledge of it, no one can porpertly offer profound answers as to why we believe, whe we have faith.

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